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Our Work
Kylti's Tanpri Arts Education Program

To support this project, please consider making a donation.

 

Tiga

Tanpri is the Creole word meaning, a "plea for help." The program derives its name from a song created by Tiga, the street kid (shown in the picture above) in Pétionville, Haiti, who is without a home or family. His song pleas for a chance to go to school because he wishes to change his beloved country, Haiti. His living condition is expressed in the song in these words: "Map domi pil sou pil...Tankou mango yap vann nan mache." Meaning, "I'm sleeping on a pile...Like mangos sold at the market."

 

Tiga offers inspiration for a brighter tomorrow, but that can only happen if conditions are right and with a good education. A renewed education system in Haiti that is based on a new model that incorporates the native language of the country, Kreyol, and the arts. One that is provided free to every child with competent teachers and positive reinforcements.

Problem:

The streets of Port-au-Prince, Pétionville, and elsewhere throughout Haiti are filled with young people—mainly boys—who wander around with no supervision, care, schooling, activity, or societal interest in their future. These young people are the future of Haiti. If continued in this current state, Haiti will be filled with what will be misguided and misdirected youths and young adults. This will inevitably to them becoming more vulnerable to illegal activities. Their survival instincts will drive their behaviors, and their attitudes will disintegrate into a point of no return. This trend will exacerbate Haiti’s political future, economy, and social structure and stability. Tourism itself will severely decline and forever be impacted.

Proposal:

Remove 30 kids from the streets of Port-au-Prince and Petionville and provide a home with a program of arts & education involving a structured regiment of art activities, hands-on training, sports, civic education, and learning targeted at each individual youth. Psychosocial evaluation will be conducted at the beginning, and will be ongoing to track progress and provide assistance to program adjustment. Volunteer nurses and doctors interested in supporting this effort can provide some health assistance. The kids will be provided with daily meals, new sets of clothes, books in Creole for learning, and a home environment that instills positive messages, builds self-esteem, and potential to develop a brighter future. Artists and teachers will work together to develop a learning program to teach the kids how to read and write, and learn various subjects in math, science, a second language, and other areas. Throughout the program period, kids will be introduced to various and organized real-life circumstances to understand better the idea of, and to help with, community development, interact with people in controlled settings, and engage them to think of their own ideas of change they would make to better and advance their lives and the country.

Objectives:

At the end of the six-month period, we expect to see a vast improvement in youth behavior, learning, ethics, civic responsibility, and increase self-esteem. After this test period, Kylti will evaluate whether they can be transitioned to a continuing education program, or kept longer at the center for further development and care.

Needs:

The program will initially require a space large enough to house and accommodate the kids, two in-house assistants, cooks, and trained educators. Artists will be solicited to volunteer time to work at the center; they will be provided with housing, food, and transportation. Books, art and office supplies, utensils, a generator, audio and video equipment, a few computers, and new clothes will be needed to begin.

Documenting, Evaluation and Progress Updates

Video documentation will follow the program from beginning to end to help inform others wanting to adopt this model approach in education to help troubled youths. Regular evaluations will be conducted of each kid to assess their progress and needs. Monthly updates with photos and videos regarding the program's advancements will be available on Kylti's Web site. Anyone wishing to visit the program in Haiti is always welcome.

Projected Costs of Program:

Total estimated costs for the six-month period: $75,000

 

To support this project, please consider making a donation.